Category Archives: Reviews

Disc Golf on YouTube: Wintermans Faves

When I really committed myself to disc golf in the fall of 2010, I was a sponge for disc related footage on YouTube. Unfortunately six years ago good coverage was hard to find. Since then there’s been an explosion of the sport on-line with what seems like unlimited tournaments, interviews and video clinics. My subscription bar always seems to have new videos every day. So I thought I’d share some of my favourite, frequently updated channels and break them down in to a few categories:

Major Tournament Coverage

  • The Spin TV – Innova’s channel, tournaments, interviews, lifestyle
  • Prodigy Disc – formerly McFlySoHigh, tournaments, team and disc info
  • McFlySoHigh Video – very high quality coverage from many major past events, not updated since 2015
  • The Disc Golf Guy – mix of tournament and blog updates, interviews
  • SmashboxxTV – featuring The Disc Golf Guy: live tournament coverage, live tournament recap shows, regular Tuesday night live podcasts
  • Jomez Productions – very high quality, Southern US focus
  • Disc Golf Pro Tour – new this year, live coverage of some very big events
  • Central Coast Disc Golf – best commentary in disc golf, focus on West Coast events, in the bag, “Ask Me Anything” with top pros, Champ vs Chumps

Regional Tournament Coverage

Manufacturers

  • DynamicDiscs – great short videos, clinics, disc comparisons, tournament previews, lifestyle
  • Latitude 64some tournament coverage, pro team in the bags, product reviews, lifestyle
  • Discraft Disc Sportshasn’t been updated in 2 years, great clinics and tutorials
  • Kastaplastdisc “explained” videos
  • LegacyDiscs – Steve Rico explaining discs and plastic
  • DGA | Disc Golf Association – clinics, thorough explanations of their products

Touring Pro Channels

  • Will Schusterick – some tournament coverage of just him, clinics, tricks, updates regularly
  • Eagle McMahon – the life of a touring teenager, updates regularly
  • Paul McBeth – hasn’t updated in a year
  • Nate Doss – infrequent updates

Other

  • Best Disc Golf Discs – Tutorials on the science behind disc flight, very easy to follow
  • Trent Nicholl – Booom disc clothing, tournaments, promos
  • Dude – Australian clothing company with many top pros

There are many other channels out there that are worth watching, please share your favourites and why in the comments.

My personal channel is djwinter77. I don’t post disc golf videos, but you can view who I follow to click their links for easy access.

Happy watching!

Derek Putt close upDerek Wintermans is a member of Team Disc Cellar and made the trip to Amateur World’s in both 2014 & 2015 before turning Pro.

VCobra: Initial reactions Michael Ramanauskas

Star VCobra

A couple days ago I found myself holding a neon pink 180 Star VCobra (5/5/-1/2) in my hand and wondering why it felt a bit odd as a mid-range. While Innova is trying some new technological adaptations with their Vtec rims (like the VRoc), sometimes you have to wonder why they are aiming to improve on a much loved disc in the first place?

I didn’t have that problem. I have never thrown a Cobra, had never intended to and am pretty happy with my bag as it is… I am a Roc guy after all.

Initially, my reaction to this oddly rimmed hunk of plastic was one of “Not sure, this seems gimmicky and is basically a beaded putter profile” and then I threw it.

I threw it every time I would normally throw a Roc or any shot between 60-250 feet. And after 36 holes, I was actually quite impressed. This disc will hold a straight line on a drive, and not the turn right/fade back left kind of straight… just straight until the end with a bit of fade to finish. Put a bit of extra snap of it, and you’ll get a nice anhyzer line that holds. Headwind? Sure, why not? While I didn’t throw it in super high wind, the 10-15km gust I threw it into didn’t seem to matter. Tomahawks and forehands worked predictably as well.

Oh, glide… lots of glide. Surprisingly, lots of glide. When throwing a shot that would normally drop with my Roc, this disc just went a bit farther, kept gliding and then decided to settle down (in a good way).

Because the underside of the wing is convex instead of concave, there is more plastic in the rim. Add to that the bead and you have a solid disc that doesn’t deform due to torsion when you snap it hard.

Will this disc replace a Roc in my bag? No, but it will make a nice addition to my bag regardless.

Michael Ramanauskas is a member of Team Disc Cellar and the owner of DoubleRam Disc and  Washline.com, and is responsible for multiple custom stamps including: the 2015 30th Anniversary Provincial Disc Golf Championships, 2014 DCO (Disc Cellar Open) and the “Smokom” Sarah Hokom signature stamp.

This review was original written in mid-December, but somehow we managed to forget to post it.

Innova Star VCobra, who wants one?

It’s REVIEW time, well not yet, but soon. It’s been a busy year for Innova with plenty of new discs being released as well as the expansion of the GStar and XT product lines. Their latest disc the Star VCobra is continuing the trend of updating older molds with newer technologies and increasing the speed rating of the disc. The Cobra (only available in DX as a production model these days) is a popular model locally, so let’s put it to the test and see if Cobra owners need to get a VCobra.

The Star VCobra is currently available and in stock in both the stock model and the First Run collectible protostar.

We’ve already got a VCobra in the hands of a trusted reviewer, and now we’re going to open things up for 2 more reviewers. So comment on this post, comment or Share through social media (and tag The Disc Cellar) and you’ll get one number for each. We’ll do a draw, as seems popular through random.org, and the winners will get to answer a skill testing question.

Here’s the catch though, if you’re one of the lucky 2 people, you need to do the following things after receiving the disc:

  1. Write a first impression review of the disc once you get it in your hand, and send it to us. This doesn’t have to be scientific, just gut reaction, does it fit your hand well? Does it feel like other discs in your bag?
  2. Throw the VCobra a lot, let friends try it out
  3. Write a review of your thoughts and experiences on the V-Tec incorporated into the disc (assuming you can even tell)
  4. Write a review of your thoughts and experiences on the VCobra after you’ve used it a lot

Here’s the tricky part, reviews must be positive in tone.  What does that mean you ask?  It means that we don’t want to have reviews that tell us how much it sucks (if it does).  Instead, we want reviews which identify what type of player is likely to enjoy the plastic/disc/flight path/et cetera.  We realize that you might not be that player, but it’s way more helpful to identify who would benefit from this disc (if anyone).  Not all discs work for all people, but most of us can imagine who a disc might be appropriate for, or under which circumstances it would excel.

You’ll be expected to get your first review in within a week of receiving the disc, and the next two within 4 weeks of receiving the disc.

If you’re not willing to write the reviews, don’t enter the give away. The VCobra’s that we have in stock are at the heavy end 174-180g, so if you wouldn’t throw these weights probably not a good choice to review them. The goal here is to give a few people the opportunity to help the rest of the disc golf community to make an informed purchase decision on this disc.

Entry deadline: noon Dec 23, 2015

Things to remember:

  • make sure that you include your name and a valid email address when filling out the comment stuff, otherwise we won’t be able to tell you that you won, and we’ll give the prize to someone else
  • comments here are “moderated” so don’t panic if your comment doesn’t appear right away…
  • Although this is targeted to our customer base, so Canadians, this give away is open to anyone anywhere (unless prohibited by law)

A bit more about the VCobra, it is a midrange rated as Speed: 5, Glide: 5, Turn: -1, Fade: 2 and features the V-Tec convex outer rim, which puts more weight in the rim keeping the flight flatter (and straighter) longer. The regular Cobra is Speed: 4, Glide: 5, Turn: -2, Fade: 2.

p.s. every purchase between now and January 8th, 2016 gets a chance to win a new Innova Heropack!

Disc Golfer of the Year!

As far as I know nothing else like this is going on, but it should be. The Disc Cellar is creating some AWARDS! Disc Golfer of the Year! This is year 1, so we’ll see how it goes. We will accept nominations via comments, email, Facebook and Twitter until January 21st, with the aim of having the list of Disc Golfers finalized shortly thereafter and having voting end mid-February-ish.

So yeah, it’s a little bit of a people’s choice award, the proposed categories are:

  • Professional Disc Golfer of the Year (BC) – ungendered
  • Professional Women’s Disc Golfer of the Year (BC) – gendered
  • Amateur Disc Golfer of the Year (BC) – ungendered
  • Amateur Women’s Disc Golfer of the Year (BC) – gendered
  • Junior Disc Golfer of the Year (BC) – ungendered
  • Disc Golf Volunteer of the Year (BC) – ungendered
  • Disc Golf Tournament Director of the Year (BC) – ungendered
  • Canadian Disc Golfer of the Year – ungendered
  • Canadian Amateur Disc Golfer of the Year – ungendered
  • Canadian Disc Golf Artist of the Year – ungendered

Aside from the honour of being chosen, each BC award recipient will receive a $25 Disc Cellar Gift Certificate, each Canadian award recipient will receive a $15 Disc Cellar Gift Certificate.

Bragging rights only categories:

  • Canadian Disc Golf Club of the Year
  • Disc Golf Course of the Year (BC)
  • Disc Golf Course of the Year (Canada)
  • Tournament Layout of the Year (BC)
  • Tournament Layout of the Year (Canada)
  • Sponsor of the Year (BC)
  • Sponsor of the Year (Canada)

These awards and nominations are largely arbitrary, but hopefully it will be fun. You can nominate people based on their contribution to the sport, their performance, club development, course development, advocacy, etc…

When nominating, you must include: who you are nominating and which category(ies) you are nominating them for. You can nominate yourself. It also is probably a little helpful if you explain why you’re nominating them, but it’s definitely not required.

Obviously in the more specific categories their achievements should be related to the category.

FAQ

  1. Can I nominate myself? Yes.
  2. Is there a residency or citizenship requirement? Nope, if a Canadian living abroad or a non-Canadian happens to have made the biggest impact in a category they are fair game.
  3. Why are the BC awards bigger? Mostly because we have more confidence that these will be “accurate”.
  4. Is this just a popularity contest? Maybe, we’ll get the nominations, and then present a list of people to vote for. Those people if they choose can campaign. That said, the final winner will not be determined by vote total alone.
  5. The final winner will not be determined by vote total alone? That’s right.
  6. What kind of mumbo jumbo is that? Let’s call it wiggle room, this is a new thing, new process, etc… so if it seems somehow as though the awards have been corrupted or a truly undeserving person would win, we reserve the right to make adjustments. We don’t expect to need to make them, but that’s the fine print.
  7. This seems like a good idea, can I join as a sponsor? Sure, happy to have other people/businesses contribute to the prize pool. Feel free to sponsor one or all categories in whatever way you can.
  8. Can the same person win multiple awards? Only if they’re that awesome! So yes.
  9. Why is the Disc Cellar doing this? Because we can, and someone should.
  10. I have a great idea for another category? Sure go ahead and suggest it.
  11. Is this timeline set in stone? Nope. If we encounter problems during the process, we’ll adjust timelines as necessary.
  12. How will the voting work? With buttons of some sort I expect. Depending on the number of qualified nominees, it might be as simple as picking one person per category. If we get a lot of nominees, we may adopt some sort of bracket based voting system for that category.
  13. How can I help? Nominate someone, or promote the awards to your Disc Golf community so their either nominate or vote.

Daedalus Proto: First Impressions – Mike

Mike R, is the owner and creative genius behind Washline.  He’s responsible for all the Disc Cellar Open (DCO) custom stamps, including the mini and he’s recently done the logo design for the 2014 BC Open.  He has recently moved from Am Intermediate to Am Advanced and normally plays out of Passive Park in Langley, BC.  He is one of three winners in our Innova Daedalus Prototype giveaway and here is his first impressions review:

I grabbed a 171g Daedalus from The Disc Cellar while at Robert Burnaby Park. The first impression was ‘This looks and feels really nice!’. The plastic felt flexy without being rubbery and the rim was nice and wide. I threw it on a few of the longer drives and was pretty happy with the distance and control I was able to get right out of the box.

Later that same day I took it to Langley (my home course) for some home ground testing.

Starting on Summer pad #1, a hole I usually throw a 171g R plastic Bolt* on, the Daedalus seemed perfect for the long drive. As a comparison I threw it flat and low… the same way I huck the Bolt on that hole. Straight down the fairway and just past the chains!

You can’t judge a disc on one throw, so I continued to throw it for every drive where I would normally use my Bolt.

After a full round, I found my drives were about 20-40 feet longer, had more control and, it may seem like a small thing, but the plastic wipes dry really easy and has great tackiness in your hand.

I have played about 10 rounds with it now and am really happy with this disc. It anhyzers when you want it to, can maintain a long straight flight on a hyzer edge and has generally increased my distance in comparison to the Bolt. The downside seems to be how the plastic changes with the weather. If your round starts off cold and finishes in the sun, the flight path will change (becoming more understable as it gets gummier) but I find that a small trade off for this durable plastic.

Power/mega distance throwers will find it fairly flippy if thrown flat, and that alone could make it a great roller, while newer players will probably be challenged if their release angles are inconsistent.

Overall, I would say that players that love the Bolt will now have an Innova option that seems to have improved on that mould.

Time to go throw it some more.

* R plastic Bolt would be a Recycled Gold Line Bolt by Latitude 64 (also carried by The Disc Cellar) and which is rated by Lat 64 as: Speed 13, Glide 6, Turn -2, Fade 3 while the Daedalus Proto is 13, 6, -4, 2 according to Innova.

The Disc Cellar currently still has about 30 of the Proto Daedalus in stuck, but once they are gone, they are gone forever.

Daedalus Giveaway

We’ve got 40 of the GStar Daedalus prototypes en route to me now (should arrive on Thursday).  We’re going to try something out and see how it works…

We’re going to give away 3 of these GStar Daedalus randomly, to people who comment on this post*.  As much as we’d like to give people bonus entries for sharing and spreading the word, we haven’t investigated how best to do that.  So we’re not this time anyway.

Here’s the catch though, if you’re one of the lucky 3 people, you need to do the following things after receiving the disc:

  1. Write a first impression review of the disc once you get it in your hand, and send it to us.
  2. Throw the Daedalus a lot
  3. Write a review of your thoughts and experiences on the GStar plastic
  4. Write a review of your thoughts and experiences on the Daedalus prototype after you’ve used it a lot

Here’s the tricky part, reviews must be positive in tone.  What does that mean you ask?  It means that we don’t want to have reviews that tell us how much it sucks (if it does).  Instead, we want reviews which identify what type of player is likely to enjoy the plastic/disc/flight path/et cetera.  We realize that you might not be that player, but it’s way more helpful to identify who would benefit from this disc (if anyone).  Not all discs work for all people, but most of us can imagine who a disc might be appropriate for, or under which circumstances it would excel.

You’ll be expected to get your first review in within a week of receiving the disc, and the next two within 4 weeks of receiving the disc.

If you’re not willing to write the reviews, don’t enter the give away. The goal here is to give a few people the opportunity to help the rest of the disc golf community to make an informed purchase decision on this disc.

I’ll do the draw next Tuesday, the 13th.

Things to remember:

  • comment on this post, not on Facebook or somewhere else
  • make sure that you include your name and a valid email address when filling out the comment stuff, otherwise we won’t be able to tell you that you won, and we’ll give the prize to someone else
  • include the answer to the following skill testing question in the comments: “If I shoot 4 under on a typical 18 hole course (par 3), how many throws did I actually use?”
  • comments here are “moderated” so don’t panic if your comment doesn’t appear right away…

 

When the shipment with the Daedalus arrives this week, we’ll have the full GStar line in stock again, at least until we start selling out again.

* we’ll throw in a classic “skill testing” question so as not to run afoul of any Canadian laws.

To everything, there is a season (Tern, Tern, Tern)

(Or, Terning the tide)

by Dan Laitsch

Very seldom has a disc actually realized the hype surrounding it. Case in point, the fabled
Quarter K by DiscWing. The quarter K was going to revolutionize the sport by using technology to design a state-of-the-art disc that would add distance to everyone’s game. Why do they call it Quarter K? Because you’ll be able to throw it a quarter of a kilometer (or 820 feet). While nobody really thought we’d all be able to throw that far, we were all lining up to try it, which is what makes the Tern all the more interesting.

The Tern is a newer disc from Innova that has quietly slipped into the market place with almost no hype, yet is taking those in-the-know by storm. The Tern showed up on courses and in stores–billed as a high speed easy to turn disc, ideal for a long-range roller or as a straight flyer for lighter arms. According to Innova, the Tern has three ratings1, depending on the plastic:

Plastic Speed
(1-13)
Glide
(1-7)
Turn
(+1 to -5)
Fade
(0-5)
Champion 12 6 -2 2
Star 12 6 -4 2
[Champion] Metal Flake (unofficial) 12 6 -3 2

While it’s been billed as great as a long range roller, it’s real strength is as a distance driver– easily surpassing my Wraiths in reliable distance.

When I first ran into the Tern last spring, I was impressed by its speed (it went fast!), but I was dismayed by its extreme flip (it went fast, in the wrong direction!). The high Glide and Turn ratings meant that the disc indeed turned radically out of my hand–an almost useless distraction from my regular long range driver (Pro or Star Wraiths).

Before I gave up on the Tern however, I threw one on a steep hyzer edge (outside edge of the disc dropped down), and watched, stunned, as the disc quickly popped up and ran on a straight line until, some 400+ feet away, it slowed down and faded back to the right (I’m a lefty, remember, so this is a natural fade for me). A little more field work to fine tune my throw and the Tern has replaced the Wraith as my go-to max-range driver.

That said, while the Tern is a great disc, it’s one that you do need to take the time to get-to-know. It’s a fickle disc because of its flippiness, especially if you tend to throw your drives flat and with a lot of snap (or spin). To get the most out of it, you need to be comfortable throwing discs on a hyzer edge and letting them stand up and fly straight. I like to compare the Tern to a Roadrunner or Sidewinder on steroids. As a result, for the Tern to be most effective, you also need a clear left or right fairway–if you only have a straight shot, the Tern is going to move side to side too much to be effective. Finally, to get the best flight path out of the disc, it needs the high speed spin, which means you need to be throwing it hard (and consequently, far). When I throw the disc “softer,” it loses the long stand up and fly straight flight path, and then tends to hyzer out early.

LHBH flight from Tern on Hyzer edge

I’ve also been experimenting with the disc for long range anhyzer bombs (where the outside edge is flipped up so that the disc loops out on a long range flight curve that is the opposite of my normal throw). While it hasn’t replaced my Roadrunner for that throw yet, I can see its potential, particularly over long distances.

Bottom line:

The Tern is a great new distance disc–I’ve heard it described by many players as a game changer for the added distance it provides. Because of the extreme speed, glide, and turn ratings, with a reliable fade, the disc is also versatile. I’ve stepped up to long holes where both lefties and righties were throwing the Tern. While it is a wide-rim disc (as most high speed drivers are) it has less width than many–more like a Wraith than a Boss. If you haven’t tried it yet, its worth taking to a field and hucking–it could very well be the game changer you’ve been looking for!

 

1 Speed is a proxy for distance–the higher the speed, the better the disc will fly through the air and the farther it will go. Glide is the ability of the disc to sustain flight–the more glide the farther the disc will fly. Turn is the extent to which a disc will “flip” or bank away from the natural turn or hyzer (for righty backhands, the natural hyzer means turning left; for lefty back hands, the natural hyzer means turning right). Discs with strong high speed turn ratings will get a nice “s” curve to them and you’ll get extra distance. Finally Fade refers to the disc’s behavior at the end of its flight as the spin speed falls off. All discs will fall back to the natural curve at the end of their flight–discs with high Fade will fall off the most at the end of their flight.

Dan’s NutSac

Well according to UPS our first order of NutSacs is supposed to arrive tomorrow at some point.  We’ll have all 5 colours of NutSac in stock, and a couple of double NutSacs as well.  In keeping with our practices they will be MSRP in Canadian funds, so $39.95 + tax and $69.95 + tax respectively ($44.75 and $78.35).

So without further ado, a product review by Dan:

Playing with a Nutsac*

* Read at your own risk

OK, full disclosure–I’ve had a Nutsac for years, so this is nothing new to me. Though
they come in many colors (I’ve seen pink, black, blue and even green Nutsacs), and
sizes (there are some large Nutsacs out there!), my Nutsac is small and brown.

While I play with it regularly, because of its small size I don’t actually use it that often
(even the largest Nutsacs I’ve seen are pretty small). Consequently, I see it as most
useful for travel, as you can throw your Nutsac over your shoulder (you wouldn’t want to
drag it on the ground), or tuck it into your trunk and head out on your adventures
minimally encumbered.

When I do play with my Nutsac, though, it can really turn heads. Last year I pulled my
Nutsac out at a tournament in Virginia and a guy I meet (Hawk) insisted that I let him
take a picture of it and post it online (you can see my Nutsac at http://tinyurl.com/seemynutsac). It turns out that he also had a Nutsac, though his was larger than mine, and he played with his Nutsac all the time. In point of fact, he mentioned that he was even sponsored to play with his Nutsac and blogs about it whenever he does. When I looked at his Nutsac online (at http://nutsacbags.com/), I discovered that he is jokingly known as “the worst sponsored player in disc golf.”

And that is probably the best thing about Nutsacs–it’s hard to take yourself too seriously
when you’re walking around the disc golf course with your Nutsac on your shoulder.

For the uninitiated who have made it this far, a Nutsac is a bag for carrying disc golf
discs, and this is an honest to goodness product review. As highlighted above, the
Nutsac is a no-frills bag that is built to wrap around discs with no extra pockets (other
than a mini pocket on the front). The small bag will comfortably hold just three drivers,
two midranges and a putter (you can buy a drink holder as an add on). This lack of
space makes them impractical as a tournament bag (in addition to 15 discs my
tournament bag contains beverages, rule books, pencils, back up discs and minis, an
umbrella, change holders, first aid kit, and who knows what else), but great as a travel
bag when on the road for work or visiting family.

I can pack my Nutsac bag, with discs, in my suitcase, taking up about as much room as
a pair of shoes. I also keep it in my jeep–which has been broken into before. While I
would hate to lose my tournament bag and discs (again!), the Nutsac with six discs
would be a tolerable loss in exchange for the flexibility of always having discs on hand.
For its size, the bag is priced at the higher end ($40 for the small bag, $70 for the large),
but the for the convenience and cool quirkiness it offers, it’s a good bag to own. As I
hope you can tell from this review, personally, I am very attached to my Nutsac.